Hirt's Key Lime Tree + Certificate - 8" Pot - NO SHIP TX,FL,AZ,CA,LA,HI

Price: $40.00


Features:
  • Size Shipped: 8" Pot
  • Make Key Lime Pie. Easy to grow. We cannot ship citrus to; Arizona, California, Florida, Hawaii, Louisiana, Puerto Rico, Texas, Virgin Islands as per USDA Regulations.
  • Easy to grow


Persian Lime Tree - Fruit Bearing Size -8" Pot-NO Ship to TX, FL, AZ, CA, LA, HI

Price: $40.00


Features:
  • Easy to grow
  • Limes are often used to accent the flavours of foods and beverages
  • Hardy in zones 10, patio or indoors. Loves the sun.


Finger Lime Tree, Australian Green Citrus (Excludes: CA,TX,LA,AZ)

Price: $49.95


Features:
  • USDA Prohibits Shipping Citrus to Arizona, California, Louisiana, Texas, Alaska, and Hawaii.
  • The pulp vessels are loosely grouped and hold their shape making them a top pick with chefs.
  • Australian Finger Lime is also called the "caviar lime" is a thorny tree with small tear drop leaves.


Meyer Lemon Tree + Certificate -Fruiting Size- 8" Pot -No Ship TX,FL,AZ,CA,LA,HI

Price: $40.00


Features:
  • Your Meyer Lemon Tree comes with a gift card certificate that assures you that your lemon tree comes from Hirt's Gardens. It also includes a history of Hirt's and our exclusive care instructions. Hirt's Gardens was established in 1915 by Sam Hirt and is one of the oldest greenhouses in Ohio.
  • Easy to grow. Can remain outside with temperatures above 40 degrees F.
  • Sweetest of all lemons. Perfect for patios or indoors. Loves the sun.


TreesAgain Key Lime Tree - Citrus × aurantiifolia - starter plug (See State Restrictions)

Price: $8.99


Features:
  • Not Shipping to ID, OR & WA due to Japanese Beetle Quarantine
  • Keep in mind our starter plugs do not quote a minimum plant size. Your plant will be small.

How to Grow Lime Trees from Clippings - Easy way to grow Lime Trees

Easy step by step tutorial for propagating new lime trees from clippings. Fun gardening project for kids, and children of all ages! This method of rooting Lime plants from clippings works for...

Your orange juice exists because of climate change in the ... - The Verge

Citrus trees migrated from the Himalayas to the rest of the world after sudden changes in the climate 6 to 8 million years ago, according to new research. As citrus spread, it changed, eventually bringing sweet orange juice to our kitchen tables.

To get a better understanding of where citrus trees came from, scientists have mapped the genomes of over 50 varieties of citrus fruit,...

Directory

  1. Lime fruit has enjoyed a boost in popularity in the U.S. in the past few decades. This has prompted many home gardeners to plant a lime tree of their own. Whether you live in an area where lime trees can grow outdoors year round or if you must grow your lime tree in a container, growing lime trees ...
  2. Tilia is a genus of about 30 species of trees, or bushes, native throughout most of the temperate Northern Hemisphere. In the British Isles they are commonly called lime trees, or lime bushes, although they are not closely related to the tree that produces the lime fruit. Other names include linden for the European species, and basswood for North American species.
  3. Lime, common (Tilia x europaea) Common lime is a deciduous broadleaf tree, native to the UK and parts of Europe.
  4. A lime (from French lime, from Arabic līma, from Persian līmū, "lemon") is a hybrid citrus fruit, which is typically round, green in color, 3–6 centimetres (1.2–2.4 in) in diameter, and contains acidic juice vesicles.. There are several species of citrus trees whose fruits are called limes, including the Key lime (Citrus aurantifolia), Persian lime, kaffir lime, and desert lime.
  5. Easy step by step tutorial for propagating new lime trees from clippings. Fun gardening project for kids, and children of all ages! This method of rooting Lime plants from clippings works for ...
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