How To Identify Hackberry Tree - Wild Edible Berries

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St. Paul Looks For Funding to Keep Up With Emerald Ash Borer ... - KSTP.com

"To date, I think about 10,000 (trees) have been removed and we have about 17,000 to go," said Clare Cloyd, a spokesperson for the city's parks and recreation department said.

Emerald Ash Borer has been impacting St. Paul since 2009. To fight the scourge, the city implemented a three-part process:

Removal, stump, then replant.

The city's annual EAB report...

Source: kstp.com

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  1. The hackberry tree is a common deciduous tree known by several names throughout the United States. It serves as a shade tree and is also used for firewood and for constructing inexpensive furniture. It's berries are edible and were also used by Native Americans for medicinal purposes.
  2. Hackberry is a tree with an elm-like form and is, in fact, related to the elm.The wood of hackberry has never been used for lumber, primarily because of the tree's softness and an almost immediate propensity to rot when in contact with the elements.
  3. Celtis is a genus of about 60–70 species of deciduous trees, commonly known as hackberries or nettle trees, widespread in warm temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, in southern Europe, southern and eastern Asia, and southern and central North America, south to central Africa, and northern and central South America.The genus is present in the fossil record at least since the Miocene ...
  4. The fruit of the hackberry is popular with winter birds, especially the cedar waxwing, mockingbird and robin. The tree also attracts many butterfly species including American snout, comma, hackberry, mourning cloak, tawny emperor and question mark.
  5. Celtis occidentalis, commonly known as the common hackberry, is a large deciduous tree native to North America. It is also known as the nettletree, sugarberry, beaverwood, northern hackberry, and American hackberry. It is a moderately long-lived hardwood with a light-colored wood, yellowish gray to light brown with yellow streaks.
Bare hackberry tree, Colonial Lake, Charleston, SC
Photo by mogollon_1 on Flickr

autumn tree leaves forest newjersey nj highlandpark rosales hackberry celtis fav10 middlesexcounty celtisoccidentalis cannabaceae nettletree northernhackberry beaverwood commonhackberry americanhackberry highlandparkmeadows
Photo by Dendroica cerulea on Flickr

autumn tree forest newjersey nj bark highlandpark rosales hackberry celtis middlesexcounty celtisoccidentalis cannabaceae nettletree northernhackberry beaverwood commonhackberry americanhackberry highlandparkmeadows
Photo by Dendroica cerulea on Flickr